Spotlights

Emily Eix

OU Major: 
Microbiology
Research Mentor: 
Marc Libault
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

The ability for plants to grow under drought conditions is becoming increasingly important. As climate change leads to more frequent occurrence of droughts, crops must be able to withstand these conditions. Sorghum, in addition to being a major food crop in the U.S., is adapted to grow in water-limited areas, and is therefore a good model for studying drought-tolerant phenotypes. The root system is specialized in the uptake of water, so we characterized morphological root traits important in the ability of a plant to adapt to drought conditions. We studied these traits by crossing drought-resistant and drought-susceptible sorghum parental lines to create recombinant lines with a mixture of these traits. Using these recombinants, we evaluated changes to the root system in response to both drought and well-watered conditions. These phenotypic adaptations to drought stress can be linked to specific genes and used to create drought-tolerant crops.

Explain what you learned or give advice to fellow students:

Throughout my time working on this project, the most important thing I have learned is how to figure out solutions when things don't go as expected. While it can be frustrating, some of the best learning comes from figuring out a different approach when something doesn't work the first time. I would say that any undergraduates interested in research should seek out any opportunities to get involved, as it is a valuable learning experience and a good way to figure out your interests.

Awards and/or presentations:

At the Spring 2018 Curiosity to Creativity Symposium, my poster received the Broader Impact award.

Published Work:

n/a

Emily Mee

OU Major: 
Political Science, co-enrolled in an accelerated Masters of Public Administration
Research Mentor: 
Dr. Ana Bracic, Dr. Cindy Simon Rosenthal
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

Research suggests that women and men legislators differ in their framing of policy issues. In studies comparing attitudes and vocabulary usage, women tended to conceptualize policy issues differently than their male colleagues. Kathlene Lyn designed an experiment testing this theory, finding that women and men legislators in Colorado considered the origins of and solutions to crime differently. Through my research, I hoped to test the generalizability of this study, by applying this hypothesis to the topic of economic opportunity through the policy issue of payday-loans. Based on existing evidence, I hypothesized that women legislators would refer to economic issues from a contextual standpoint, in this case using situational words to describe the high number of payday-loan borrowers. In contrast, I hypothesize that male legislators use language more instrumental in nature; alluding to the idea that people are autonomous individuals responsible for their own successes and failures.

Explain what you learned or give advice to fellow students:

My experiences with this research project opened me up to a new set of skills and experiences that I know will be valuable when applying for graduate school. I would advise students to get started on a research project as early as possible in your academic career. Figure out what you're passionate about, and find a mentor in your field.

Awards and/or presentations:

Presented at NCUR 2018, and at Curiosity 2 Creativity 2018 Spring Symposium, Received "Best Broadest Impact" award

Published Work:

n/a

Courtney Geller

OU Major: 
Studio Art
Research Mentor: 
Todd Stewart/Robert Bailey
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

Fieldworks is an initiative of the School of Visual Arts at the University of Oklahoma that blends research and teaching in an ongoing artistic and art-historical exploration of land use and interpretation in the deserts of the western United States. Open-ended, collaborative, and transdisciplinary, its participants engage in fieldwork that results in creative, scholarly, and pedagogical outcomes, including exhibitions, publications, and events that explore the changing relationship between humanity and the planet. Among its core elements is a biannual two-week excursion into the field that brings the School’s faculty, students, and staff together to explore a central thematic. For the 2013 Road to Ruscha project, this meant retracing the path that the artist Ed Ruscha traveled to create his seminal 1963 artist’s book Twentysix Gasoline Stations. In 2015, a second group traveled throughout the Sonoran, Mojave, and Great Basin Deserts to investigate earthworks such as...

Awards and/or presentations:

Geller, Courtney. "Fieldworks: An Artistic and Art Historical Exploration of Land use and Interpretation." Curiosity to Creativity Spring Symposium, 25 April 2018, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Norman, OK

Published Work:

n/a

Rose Marinaro

OU Major: 
Chemical Engineering
Research Mentor: 
Angela Person
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

Poster presentation of research produced during "Environment and Society," situating an object of concern (Dams) at the intersections of environment and society.

Awards and/or presentations:

Marinaro, Rose. "What’s the Dam Problem?." Curiosity to Creativity Spring Symposium, 25 April 2018, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Norman, OK

Published Work:

n/a

Camille Schlemme

OU Major: 
Environmental Sustainability
Research Mentor: 
Angela Person
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

"Environment and Society," situating an object of concern (The Risks and Hazards Associated With The Production And Use of Concrete) at the intersections of environment and society

Awards and/or presentations:

Schlemme, Camille. "The Risks and Hazards Associated With The Production And Use of Concrete." Curiosity to Creativity Spring Symposium, 25 April 2018, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Norman, OK

Published Work:

n/a

Florence Hamper

OU Major: 
Criminology
Research Mentor: 
Angela Person
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

Poster presentation of research produced during "Environment and Society," situating an object of concern (Cruise Ships) at the intersections of environment and society.

Awards and/or presentations:

Hamper, Florence. "Cruise Ships." Curiosity to Creativity Spring Symposium, 25 April 2018, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Norman, OK

Published Work:

n/a

Ben Whipkey

OU Major: 
Biology
Research Mentor: 
Elizabeth Bergey
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

The Tiger Snail (Anguispira alternata) is an eastern land snail that extends into northeastern Oklahoma. Beyond this range, a large disjunct population occurs in the central Oklahoma (Cleveland and McClain Counties). We assessed possible mechanisms for long-distance dispersal, using timed searches of preferred habitats in woodlands in 19 counties extending westward from the eastern Oklahoma range limit. No snails were found in between historical and disjunct populations. However, empty shells were found in Bryan County (southcentral Oklahoma), washed up along the shoreline of Lake Texoma. These shells originated in the Washita River drainage and were carried downstream to Lake Texoma during floods – indicating that the disjunct population is widely spread (e.g., possibly in Garvin County). Because snails move slowly, the lack of tiger snails between the known and disjunct sites indicates movement via human activities, such as the transport by firewood or the plant trade, rather than...

Awards and/or presentations:

Whipkey, Ben. "Long distance travel - at a snails pace." Curiosity to Creativity Spring Symposium, 25 April 2018, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Norman, OK

Published Work:

n/a

Elizabeth Van Swearingen

OU Major: 
Spanish/Modern Languages, Literature, and Linguistics
Research Mentor: 
Julie Ward
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

I analyze a theatrical piece done by Perla de la Rosa that is called "Antígona: las voces que incendian el desierto". This work addresses the violence against the women in Ciudad Juárez, México. According to her text and other articles, I conclude that she adapted Antigone from Sophocles in order to draw attention to the idea that not only is the violence against women a problem, but also that the government is aiding and abetting this violence by denying the women their due justice. I also suggest a solution for the violence, according to Perla de la Rosa's work and related articles.

Awards and/or presentations:

Van Swearingen, Elizabeth. "Antígona en Juárez: Perla de la Rosa y las culpables por la violencia." Curiosity to Creativity Spring Symposium, 25 April 2018, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Norman, OK

Published Work:

n/a

Kooper Taylor

OU Major: 
Spanish
Research Mentor: 
Julie Ward
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

My research aim is to investigate the representation of femicide in various films and theatrical productions. Femicide is the term used to refer to the period of brutal violence towards women in Juarez, Mexico from 1993 to the early 2000s. Since that time, it has received significant international attention and has become the inspiration of many cinematographic and literary pieces. In order to investigate its representation in contemporary works, I analyzed a selection of documentaries, fiction films, and plays in order to see how each author attempts to convey the topic as well as highlight any underlying messages in relation.

Awards and/or presentations:

Taylor, Kooper. "Representation and Criticism of Femicide in Contemporary Film and Theatre." Curiosity to Creativity Spring Symposium, 25 April 2018, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Norman, OK

Published Work:

n/a

Emilee Sullivan

OU Major: 
Spanish/Modern Languages
Describe your undergraduate research or creative project:

This project is an analysis of the psychology of women in times of conflict, as depicted by Colombian playwright Enrique Buenaventura in his work Los papeles de infierno.

Awards and/or presentations:

Sullivan, Emilee. "La Mujer en Los Papeles de Infierno." Curiosity to Creativity Spring Symposium, 25 April 2018, Oklahoma Memorial Union, Norman, OK

Published Work:

n/a

Pages